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    Appreciation      

    Appreciating the wonder and beauty of the world and its people.

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    Cooperation       

    Cooperating, colaborating,and leading or following as the situation demands.

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    Empathy    

    Imagining themselves in another’s situation in order to understand his or her reasoning and emotions,so as to be open-minded and reflective about the perspectives of others.

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    Enthusiasm       

    Enjoying learning and willingly putting the effort into the process.

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    Respect      

    Respecting themselves,others and the world around them.

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    Confidence      

    Feeling confident in their ability as learners, having the courage to take risks, applying what they have learned and making appropriate decisions and choices.

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    Integrity      

    Being honest and demonstrating a considered sense of fairness.

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    Independence       

    Thinking and acting independently, making their own judgements based on reasoned argument, and being able to defend their judgements.

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    Open – Minded     

    We critically appreciate our own cultures and personal histories, as well as the values and traditions of others. We seek and evaluate a range of points of view, and we are willing to grow from the experience.

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    Creativity       

    Being creative and imaginative in their thinking and their approach to problems and dilemmas.

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    Commitment     

    Being committed to their own learning, preserving and showing self-dicipline and responsibility.

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    Balanced     

    We understand the importance of balancing different  aspects of our lives intellectual, physical, and emotional to achieve well-being for ourselves and others. We recognize our interdependence with other people and with the world in which we live.

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    Reflective        

    We thoughtfully consider the world and our own ideas and experience. We work to understand our strengths and weaknesses in order to support our learning and personal development.

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    Knowledgeable        

    We develop and use conceptual understanding, exploring knowledge across a range of disciplines. We engage with issues and ideas that have local and global signi­cance.

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    Tolerance       

    Being sensitive about differences and diversity in the world and being responsive to the needs of others.

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    Communicator     

    We express ourselves confi­dently and creatively in more than one language and in many ways. We collaborate effectively, listening carefully to the perspectives of other individuals and groups.

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    Curiousity    

    Being curious about the nature of learning, about the world, its people and cultures..

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    Caring     

    We show empathy, compassion and respect. We have a commitment to service, and we act to make a positive difference in the lives of others and in the world around us.

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    Risk – Taker    

    We approach uncertainty with forethought and determination; we work independently and cooperatively to explore new ideas and innovative strategies. We are resourceful and resilient in the face of challenges and change.

More than 4,000 schools around the world have chosen to teach International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes, with their unique academic rigour and their emphasis on students’ personal development. Those schools employ over 70,000 educators, teaching more than one million students worldwide.

International Baccalaureate (IB) programmes aim to do more than other curricula by developing inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who are motivated to succeed.

The IB’s programmes are different from other curricula because they:

  • encourage students of all ages to think critically and challenge assumptions
  • develop independently of government and national systems, incorporating quality practice from research and our global community of schools
  • encourage students of all ages to consider both local and global contexts
  • develop multilingual students.

Education in International Baccalaureate schools:

  • centres on learners
  • develops effective approaches to teaching and learning
  • works within global contexts, helping students understand different languages and cultures
  • explores significant content, developing disciplinary and interdisciplinary understanding that meets rigorous international standards.

Students at International Baccalaureate World Schools are given a unique education. They will:

  • be encouraged to think independently and drive their own learning
  • take part in programmes of education that can lead them to some of the highest ranking universities around the world
  • become more culturally aware, through the development of a second language
  • be able to engage with people in an increasingly globalized, rapidly changing world.

This approach is in line with the philosophy of the 21st century education. In the IB, the learning outcomes of the 21st century are represented through the IB Learner Profile.

The International Baccalaureate (IB) learner profile describes a broad range of human capacities and responsibilities that goes beyond academic success.

Each of the IB’s programme is committed to the development of students according to the IB learner profile.

why-ib

The profile aims to develop learners who are:

  • Inquirers
  • Knowledgeable
  • Thinkers
  • Communicators
  • Principled
  • Open-minded
  • Caring
  • Risk-takers/ Courageous
  • Balanced
  • Reflective

The IB learner profile also represents a synthesis of the essential elements of the PYP. Throughout the primary years, the students engage in structured inquiry that synthesizes knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes and action. In doing so, they develop the attributes described in the learner profile. This profile provides powerful goals that serve learning across all areas of the curriculum.

The International Baccalaureate offers four programmes:

  • Primary Years Programme; age range 3-12
  • Middle Years Programme; age range 11-16
  • Diploma Programme; age range 16-19
  • Career-related Programme; age range: 16-19

The PYP curriculum contains three key components (written, taught and assessed curriculum), which explain how students learn, how educators teach, and the principles and practice of effective assessment within the programme.

In the PYP a balance is sought between acquisition of essential knowledge and skills, development of conceptual understanding, demonstration of positive attitudes, and taking of responsible action. PYP person grows as a whole person.